Saturday, April 1, 2017

Taking AIM at Alzheimer's

Linda Fisher and Congresswoman Hartzler
What is it that brings me back to Washington, D.C., year after year? It’s not the cherry blossoms. It’s not the Smithsonian or the monuments. It’s not the food, although after a meal with my besties—Jane, Kathy, and Sarah—at the historic Old Ebbitt Grill, I created a hashtag: #eatingourwayacrossDC.

The reason I come to D.C. every year is to join with like-minded advocates who are good and tired of the heartbreak of Alzheimer’s. We think it’s darned time to find a cure.

Each year we are joined by an influx of first-timers. The Alzheimer’s Association and those of us with the multiple stars on our badges do everything we can to make sure they are prepared for the Hill. Once they have the information and the “collateral” they put on their comfortable walking shoes and head to the Hill where many voices will share the same message.

I believe 1,300 purple sashes make quite a statement on Capitol Hill. As I went from appointment to appointment on Hill Day, we were the most visible group around.

Advocates from across the U.S. visited the offices of their senators and representative. The 23-member Missouri advocates first appointment of the day was a coffee at Senator Roy
Blunt’s office. We boarded the first bus leaving the hotel and arrived at the Hill in time for the 9:00 appointment. That is, it would have been time enough except for the long line of people trying to get through security. As we stood in a non-moving line, we were directed to a different door so that we arrived in the nick of time. After a photo with the Senator, we visited with his health aide, Desiree Mowry.

Desiree Mowry and Betty Johnson
After our visit with Senator Blunt, we split up. Some had house appointments and had to travel to the house side of the Capitol. Others of us, the “A” group (we referred to ourselves as the A-Team) moved to the Hart building where we would meet with Emma Kenyon, Senator Claire McCaskill’s legislative aide. After that visit, several of our group headed home, but I had an appointment with Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler in the afternoon.

Our “ask” this year was two-fold. First, we asked for a $414 million increase for Alzheimer’s research. This is the amount that scientists at the NIH submitted as a “Bypass Budget” proposal. Based on the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act passed in 2015, this is the amount to keep us on track to prevent or develop an effective treatment by 2025.

The second ask was for co-sponsors for PCHETA (Palliative Care and Hospice Education and Training Act). PCHETA (SB 693, HB 1676) is so important that more than 40 groups are working toward passage. Nursing home residents who receive palliative care at the end of life are 15 times less likely to die in a hospital. Palliative care reduces emergency room visits and hospitalization. This Act would (a) increase the palliative care and hospice workforce by establishing training programs, (b) launch a national campaign to inform patients, families, and health care professionals about availability of services, (3) enhance palliative care research.

Add your voice to our voices. Email, write, call your senator and representative to support research funding and PCHETA.

For $20, you can join the Alzheimer’s Association’s sister organization AIM (Alzheimer’s Impact Movement) $20. AIM (a) advocates for legislation to advance research and enhance care and support for those affected by Alzheimer’s, (2) supports the re-election of our Congressional champions, and (3) speaks on behalf of the Alzheimer’s community when 501(c)(3) organizations like the Alzheimer’s Association must remain silent. Join AIM at the link below using my referral code.

Just a few minutes of your time can make a lifetime of difference for three of your fellow Americans who developed Alzheimer’s in the time it took you to read this article.

Copyright © April 2017 by L.S. Fisher


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