Presentations

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Blowin' in the Wind

As usual, I was running late for an appointment this morning. As I turned onto the highway, I noticed my Sedalia Democrat had been delivered to my paper box. Deciding I could be on time if I didn’t waste the couple of minutes to pick up the paper, I left it.

After my appointment, I made my usual stop at Walmart. As I pushed my cart into the parking lot, I had to battle the wind to keep the cart going forward instead of sideways. Talk about a strong wind. The wind buffeted my car on the way home, and I parked at the end of the driveway to get my paper and mail. The paper was gone. I looked around and found it lying in the ditch.

After I retrieved the paper, I grabbed a stack of mail out of the mailbox. The wind ripped a few pieces out of my hands and whimsically scattered them into the aforementioned ditch. Have you ever chased paper that a gust of wind takes out of your reach time after time?

The Bob Dylan song “Blowin’ in the Wind” came to mind. Bits and pieces of the lyrics teased my memory. I remembered unanswered questions about manhood, white doves, cannon balls, mountains washing to the sea, and pretending not to notice freedom lost.

The most haunting line in Dylan’s song is about too many people dying. Every year 700,000 people die from Alzheimer’s, and so far we haven’t been about to do one thing to stop it. Not one single thing!

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 5.4 million people are living, and dying, with the disease. Around 200,000 people younger than age 65 have Alzheimer’s. Many are much, much younger.

Each year I join other advocates nationally to advocate for more research funds. In our packets, we have information that compares research funds for Alzheimers compared to the amount allocated to fight other diseases. This dedication to fighting diseases has paid big dividends. At one time, a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS was a death sentence. Research has played a huge role in finding effective treatments for cancer and heart disease.

Lately, two promising drug therapies failed during drug trials. When these treatments failed, we were disappointed, but we haven’t given up!

Some of the brightest minds are working diligently to cure this incurable disease. In the meantime, it is important that caregivers and persons with dementia have the care and support they need to live life to the fullest. Those on the front lines need respite, home and community based support, family support, and a reason to hope. They need to know that we have their backs.

I was at the Missouri State Capitol on Memory Day advocating for respite funds. The Missouri state budget has been slashed, including a big reduction in the $450,000 service grants that our friends, neighbors, and families rely on for respite. This is a case of saving pennies and costing dollars. Respite helps keep persons with Alzheimer’s at home longer. A simple formula shows a possible cost savings of $2 million for the state. Here’s how it works:  800 respite families X $157 average NH Medicaid cost per day X 30 days delay in NH placement X 60% of NH residents on Medicaid = $2 million savings in Medicaid NH costs.

I’m going to D.C. at the end of March to visit Senator McCaskill, Senator Blunt and Congresswoman Hartzler. Although, I take the fight to Capitol Hill, each of us has the power to make a difference without leaving the comfort of home. Call, write, or email your legislators, especially when legislation is pending or advocates are visiting.

Become a voice. Answer the calls to action. By keeping up-to-date on Alzheimer’s legislation, you can learn how to be an effective advocate.

It may seem that the answer to a cure is blowing in the wind, but if we chase it hard enough, we will eventually find it.

Copyright © February 2017 by L.S. Fisher

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